Graves Law Denied Review by U.S. Supreme Court

In an announcement Nov. 28, the U.S. Supreme Court denied review of Graves Law, which had been challenged by the Association for the American Justice (AAJ) in September. Graves Law prohibits states from imposing vicarious liability onto non-negligent rental and leasing companies.

The Truck Renting and Leasing Association (TRALA) said in a prepared statement:

“TRALA appreciates the common-sense approach that the Supreme Court took in denying the petition to review the Graves Law. In addition to today's denial to review the Graves Law by the United States Supreme Court, the constitutional and pre-emptive authority of the Graves Law has been upheld by the highest courts in Florida, Minnesota, New York and Connecticut, as well as the United States Court of Appeals. The Graves Law has saved non-negligent TRALA members hundreds of millions of dollars annually in potential frivolous lawsuits and legal costs since its passage in 2005.”

To read about the recent petition for review and history of Graves Law, click here.

Comment On This Story

Name:  
Email:  
Comment: (Max. 10000 characters)  
Please leave blank:
* Please note that every comment is moderated.

Newsletter: Sign up to receive latest news, articles, and much more.

Read the latest

Auto Focus Blog: A blog covering fleets, auto rental and the business of cars

The Promise of Telematics for Small Fleets

Did you know women really are safer drivers than men? Using this and other types of big data to analyze risk is the new frontier for small fleets.

How Phil LeBeau Got it Wrong

The CNBC airline and auto reporter made some questionable assumptions as to the health of the car rental industry.

“Total Loss” Category Causing Unneeded Losses for Fleets

On Carfax and AutoCheck’s vehicle history reports, the category “Total Loss” is often used for vehicles that are satisfactorily repaired. Is that fair?

Job Finder: Access Top Talent. Fill Key Positions.