San Francisco Evaluates Carsharing Parking Program

Zipcar is one of the carsharing companies that is part of San Francisco's carsharing parking pilot program. Photo courtesy of Zipcar.
Zipcar is one of the carsharing companies that is part of San Francisco's carsharing parking pilot program. Photo courtesy of Zipcar.

The city of San Francisco is reconsidering the number of parking spaces it will reserve for carsharing companies in its pilot program, according to a report by the San Francisco Examiner.

San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors Government Audit and Oversight Committee are reviewing the two-year pilot program that designates 200 parking spaces for carsharing, says the report. Three carsharing companies were selected for the program: City Car Share, Zipcar, and Getaround.

The carsharing companies took away parking spots in neighborhoods where parking is already scarce, but Andy Thornley of the SFMTA’s sustainable streets division told the Examiner that the 200 spaces are showing high use.

“We are thinking about should there be a cap on this,” Thornley told the Examiner in regards to parking spaces. “We got to 200. We had a license for 900. That’s an open question. It’s all on the table.”

There are an estimated 275,450 parking spaces in San Francisco, says the report.

Thornley is presenting an evaluation of the pilot on Jan. 20. A formal proposal for the SFMTA board could come in February or March, according to the report.

Click here for the full San Francisco Examiner report.

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