Decline in Global Travelers to U.S. Costing Nation Billions

A nearly 20-percent drop in the United States' share of the overseas travelers since 2000 has cost the nation billions of dollars in revenue and nearly 200,000 jobs, according to a study conducted by the Travel Industry Association, on behalf of the Discover America Partnership.

The organization will offer an in-depth report with a series of detailed recommendations to reverse the decline and attract more travelers to the United States, including a push for Congressional action.

In 2000, U.S. market share of the $6 trillion worldwide travel market stood at 7.5 percent. By 2006, the country's share had dropped to 6.1 percent. (Since Sept. 11, 2001, overseas travel to the U.S. has declined by 17 percent.)

The study looked at the economic "ripple effect," over time, as a result of the drop—such as the potential loss of spending, employment, payroll and tax receipts due to a loss of international visitors.

According to the study, the damage to America's economy includes:

  • 58 million fewer visitors;
  • 194,000 lost jobs;
  • $25.9 billion in lost payroll;
  • $94 billion in lost spending; and
  • $15.6 billion in lost taxes to federal, state and local governments.

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