Airport Rental Fees Likely to Double by 2030

The Port of Seattle Commission recently agreed to allow the daily airport-levied car rental fees to be raised to cover the port’s bond and lease obligations on a new rental car facility at Seattle’s Sea-Tac Airport. Those who rent cars at the airport will likely see their daily airport-levied fees more than doubled to $9 by 2030, according to the Seattle Post Intelligencer.

The $326 million multi-story building will house the consolidated operations of the airport’s largest rental car companies, which currently use the crowded parking garage as well as off-site locations that they will continue to use to service and store their vehicles.

To that end, the port commission approved a bond issuance of up to $425 million to pay for $375 million of the nearly $400 million project, which also includes off-site transportation improvements and money to build, operate and maintain a 34-bus shuttle system. The bonds will be paid for by those who rent cars at Sea-Tac Airport, which has levied a $4 customer facility charge per day of rental car use since February 2006.

Port staffers, who will report back to the commission annually, anticipate the charge to be $5 per day on July 1, around $6 per day when the facility opens in 2011, and $10 per day by 2040, according to the Post Intelligencer.

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