New Car-Sharing Service in Japan features Nissan’s Ultra-Compact EV

Photo of the Nissan New Mobility Concept courtesy of Nissan.
Photo of the Nissan New Mobility Concept courtesy of Nissan.

Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. and the City of Yokohama introduced a round-trip car sharing service featuring the Nissan New Mobility Concept, an ultra-compact electric vehicle.

The service, “Choimobi Yokohama,” enables users who register online to pick up and return cars in 14 locations around Yokohama Station. Cars can be reserved 30 minutes in advance and can be driven within the city, according to Nissan.

The service costs 250 yen per 15 minutes plus a 200 yen basic charge, with a maximum daily charge of 3,000 yen. Users need a Japanese driver’s license, a smartphone, and a Japan-issued credit card.

Nissan and the City of Yokohama previously conducted a two-year trial of Japan’s first one-way car sharing service using ultra-compact electric vehicles, starting in October 2013. The goal was to encourage low-emission transport options, improve the quality of transportation and promote tourism. In October 2015, the partnership began renting cars to local tour operators and businesses.

The new round-trip service is meant to further promote ultra-compact mobility and build a sustainable business model through public-private cooperation. The service will also include guided tours around central Yokohama and long-term car rentals for businesses.

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